Béla bartók bartók – michael gielen piano concertos nos 2 and 3


After graduating from the Academy Bartók began a career as a concert pianist. During his adult life Bartók performed in 630 concerts in 22 countries. In 1907 he became a piano instructor at the Budapest Academy. Although he did not especially care for teaching, he remained in this post for more than 25 years. His most notable contributions to pedagogy were the teaching editions he made of the works of Bach, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven and the pieces he composed for children.

His fame as both composer and pianist spread fast. Between 1926 and 1931 he wrote the first two of his three piano concertos as vehicles for his own playing. Typically, though, he resisted adopting the life of a touring composer-virtuoso. He continued with his folk-music studies and with developing his own musical language, exploring the nature of variation, the viability of symmetrical forms and a whole array of novel sounds in pieces such as the Third, Fourth and Fifth Quartets (1927, 1928, 1934), the Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta (1936) and the Sonata for two pianos and percussion (1937). His later music veers towards a more diatonic sound-world, though formal process and proportion always remained important issues.

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Béla Bartók Bartók – Michael Gielen Piano Concertos Nos 2 and 3Béla Bartók Bartók – Michael Gielen Piano Concertos Nos 2 and 3Béla Bartók Bartók – Michael Gielen Piano Concertos Nos 2 and 3Béla Bartók Bartók – Michael Gielen Piano Concertos Nos 2 and 3

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